Painting Furniture Without Brush Strokes

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Everyone is different when it comes to the look of their furniture.  Some prefer to go to a thrift shop for an urban “Hipster” look, others prefer a perfectly smooth finish with a touch of elegance, while some like a rustic look as if it were painted in the backyard; the point is everyone is different.  Yet how do you get a perfectly smooth painted finish on that dresser when it’s needing to be repainted?  Follow the tips below.  NOTE- this will require you to put in some time and effort, but you will be proud of your work!

Use a High Quality BrushIt’s simple, higher quality paint brushes don’t show paint stroke as much, where lower quality brushes do, and believe it or not- the type of paint you use can affect the type of brush you should use. If you plan on using a latex paint, you should consider using a nylon or polyester brush; for oil based paints, use a natural bristle brush.  Some great paint brush brands are Purdy & Wooster.

FloetrolFloetrol is an additive you can mix into the paint that will keep your paint from drying as fast, which will give it more time to meld together or self-level and eliminate brush strokes.  Be aware of the conditions that you’re going to be painting in.  If it is a hot day, the paint will be drying quicker, which means that the brush stroke will be harder to hide.  You may want to consider adding Floetrol.

Longer Bristles Are Better – The shorter the bristles, the more the strokes will show… It is that simple.

Try a Roller – Use a roller on the longer, flat surfaces, and a brush for the smaller details.  When using a roller, roll in one direction.  If you roll in different directions, you can end up with roller marks.

Sand – If you do end up with some brush strokes- don’t worry.  Sand down that one area, and paint again.  Be sure that you wait for the paint to dry before you go back to sand or repaint.

What’s great about this technique is that you can use this, even if you want a distressed/antiqued look for your furniture.  But most importantly, remember to have fun!

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Painting Your Front Door

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A new coat of paint on your front door can breath all new life into your home, and it’s a lot easier than you may think!  Yes, you will have to put in some elbow grease, but it shouldn’t take you more than a day to complete.

Types of Paint

Because your front door is open to the elements outside, you’ll want to use an acrylic latex paint with an oil-based primer; this will cover any old paint left on the door.  However, if you have a brand new door that has never been painted, you are able to use an oil-based paint instead.

Techniques

When you begin, be sure that it is going to be a nice day (not too humid or cold) because you want the paint to dry fairly quickly… Especially if you’re using an oil-based paint.

You’ll need to take the door off of it’s hinges, and place it where you’ll be painting- make sure it is a well ventilated area (like outside).  You can place some plastic over the doorway to help keep bugs outside, and to prevent people from seeing into your house.

Once the door is ready, remove the handles, and any other hardware left on it.  Thoroughly clean the door by scrubbing the surface with a wet sponge, allow to dry, then sand the surface of the door. Patch any cracks in the door with a quick-drying wood filler, then when it dries, sand the filler to make it smooth. Use a rag to brush off the dust from sanding, and you will be ready to apply the primer.  Cover with painter’s tape any trim, windows, and anything else that you don’t want to get paint on.

Apply the primer to the all surfaces on the door and let it dry completely. Then you are ready to apply the paint. Start by using a brush to paint any raised or depressed panels on the door, or around any crevices. You can then proceed to paint the flat surfaces of the door with a roller. Once the first coat is applied, allow it to dry, and apply a second coat for a beautiful finish.

Proper Disposal of Paint and Florecent Lights

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For many of us, green living is becoming the common goal. Within our households, we strive to make environmentally-friendly choices. So why, with all of this concentrated effort at healthiness, do our garages continue to be toxic waste sites? Being in the Painting business, I find myself in garages on a daily basis, and have come to learn ways to help.
Some of the most common problems are how to dispose of old paint and fluorescent lights; luckily both of these issues can be solved at your local Home Depot.  Recently, environmental laws have changed that greatly simplify disposing of all paints.  When you purchase these items, you’ll notice a charge for disposing hazardous waste. This fee enables you to bring old latex paints into the store that are no longer useful, and at no cost! Actually, all stores that sell paints must also accept returns of the product. If you have any questions, or wonder if your materials are compliant to be returned, contact me and I’ll guide you through the process.
There is another way to dispose of your paint that can also help your local community; charities and non-profits always have projects going on that require paint, and are willing to accept donations. Should you wish to donate your unwanted paints, feel free to reach out to any in your area; chances are, they’ll even come pick it up from you!
Another product you should dispose of properly are fluorescent lights, especially because they contain hazardous Mercury. I’m happy to say that I tested Home Depot’s return policy yesterday, and they accepted my discarded lights with a smile and no questions- how’s that for service